Customization strategy. Stick to the plan

In this post I want to share my experiences in the support of the governance process that is responsible for keeping the level of customization for a standard package solution under control. How do we approach this? It's easy to boldly say upfront that you rather adapt your way of working than to customize the software you bought. This post is all about sticking to that decision even when the going gets tough.

What is a project if not an epic journey

One thing we've learned from the first phase of the iHRM program is that a complete waterfall approach with one delivery moment, followed by an extended user acceptance period is not the silver bullet. For the second phase of the program, the scope is wider and the number of project teams is higher. In this blog post, I'll share some insights on how to effectively manage scope while going for an iterative and incremental development plan.

10 ways to make Scrum fail

You've probably already heard of Scrum, the popular agile software development framework. While the basics aren't difficult, a lot of people seem to fail implementing it. In this post I'll sum up 10 things you should do if you want your Scrum project to fail miserably.

  1. No or bad retrospectives


Some take aways from the 23rd BAEA Café with Chris Potts

Always inspiring, a seminar by Chris Potts. So I was keen on joining this evening’s EA Café about linking enterprise architecture to enterprise investment. If you haven’t read his books or participated in one of his workshops, I strongly encourage you to do so. Here are some things and questions that stuck with me today.

  • Do you want to make your projects succesful, or your portfolio? If your portfolio is managed well, it gives you enough probability of success to ensure running a healthy business, yet allows for enough risk to prevent you from standing still.

Business Cases: getting money or creating value?

Business cases are a valuable instrument, but in practice they are not always applied correctly. They are often ‘misused’ in an attempt to get budgets allocated or to win projects. During a most interesting evening with our Business Analysis community, many colleagues presented real-life examples of how business cases are typically used by our customers. It was fascinating to see how the same patterns kept returning again and again.

What’s wrong with business cases?

Someone mentioned that: "You can always calculate your profit with a business case". As a result, business cases become more of a sales instrument for projects instead of a management instrument to evaluate and follow up on investments. And that is a shame, because business cases are extremely useful when applied correctly.

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