Five Questions on Front-End Engineering with Glenn Dejaeger

Web applications are powerful tools to provide new and always-accessible services to your customers and employees. Their popularity has made front-end engineering a highly dynamic and exciting playing field. Businesses, employees and customers are exposed to a lot of new web technologies, rich user interfaces and services though it’s not always easy to see how it can impact and really help your business activities.

Customization strategy. Stick to the plan

In this post I want to share my experiences in the support of the governance process that is responsible for keeping the level of customization for a standard package solution under control. How do we approach this? It's easy to boldly say upfront that you rather adapt your way of working than to customize the software you bought. This post is all about sticking to that decision even when the going gets tough.

To boldly go further than changes in IT

What is a project? In its most simple definition it means implementing a change in a controlled way so that the investor doesn't need to take a leap in the dark. The word 'controlled' and 'change' are key in this simple definition. In this post, I’ll focus on our approach to define the way in which the business needs to change its way of working and how we leveraged our corporate process model to do so.

Yeah sure. How exactly are we going to do this again?

Previously I've pleaded for simple architectural designs that are easily understood by all stakeholders. This way the idea gets the support it needs. As a project evolves into the ICT design and development phase, both idea and design will need to be made more tangible. This is especially true when it comes to making it all work together. The purpose stays the same: to avoid ambiguity. The means? Keep it again as simple as possible by focusing on what really matters.

Search for value through simplification

I'm an architect. As most architects, I like to design things and conceptualize ideas. But a common pitfall for us architects is that we design things that are very clear for... other architects. Other audiences are often left puzzled or confused. This is commonly referred to as the ivory tower phenomenon. I'm also a result driven pragmatist; I love to realize ideas. To make something happen, you first need to convince the stakeholder or sponsor that provides the budget to realize your idea. In this post I'd like to share my experience in architectural models that have proven to work for me.

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